Engaging young people in advocacy, education & prevention
Creating social change around alcohol, drugs, and more

Reality Party Feedback and News Coverage

February 1, 2017 2:12 pm Published by Leave your thoughts

Not sure if a Reality Party’s right for you? Read an excerpt or follow the links below to get a larger impression of what they’re all about and see what kind of experiences recent attendees have had!

For a rundown and explanation of our Reality Parties for Parents, check out this page.

January 2017 – Palos Verdes

Schools must also be more proactive in preventing reckless teenage behavior, organizers said. After attending a reality party in Thousand Oaks, PVHS school nurse Marisa Trevett and counselor Christina Sunada knew such an event was needed in PV.

“Everyone learned a lot,” Trevett said. “It was well received by all the parents. Something like this has never been done on the Peninsula. We need to educate parents on the Hill about the culture of today’s teens. It’s different then when most of the parents were growing up.”

PVHS is the first area school to partner with Straight Up Reality Improv parties, and it remains unclear whether Reality Parties for Parents will be lasting deterrents in curtailing what many say is a rampant drug problem among students at all three Peninsula high schools. Party plans for area middle school parents are reportedly in the works.

“I think this information is good for parents to have before their kids get to high school,” Kasmir said.

May 2016 – Santa Monica

If you want to see what actually goes on at house parties your teenagers are attending, a Reality Party demonstrates just that. Drama students from local schools stage a typical scenario, parents observe, then participate in a 30-minute debrief with expert panelists to answer questions and discuss ideas for change.  “Flabbergasted!” was the reaction of one father in attendance, who said his experience would definitely would make him move vigilant.

April 2016 – Garden Grove

A debriefing session is held post party with counselors and police, who lead group discussions so parents can ask questions about what they just saw. Garden Grove Police Chief Todd Elgin was there. So was former state senator and former  Orange County Board of Supervisor Lou Correa, who is running for Congress (and is also on the board of directors for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Garden Grove).

This was Garden Grove Police Sgt. John Reynolds’ fourth Reality Party and he says the parents who pass through always learn something new.

“A lot of them are completely shocked,” Lambert says. “Especially (about) the new drug trends. It’s a very intense thing.”